Stillwater Artisanal Ales – Sensory Series V.1 – Lower Dens

It’s been a few months since I posted on here.  I’m not making excuses with my lack of content.  I definitely sat here on the lower denscouch many nights and could have put more than a few posts together.  Instead I’ve let the blog suffer for sure.  I make no promises this will be the big hop off back into the world of blogging, but I would like to try to re-embrace my attempts to make this blog flourish.  About this time last year I was pumping out a blog every single day.  I’m honestly not sure I could ever return to that former glory, but I’m going to try to do a blog or two every week.

My two year anniversary of this blog has certainly come and gone, but I’m still sticking with the original concept I had when I first started writing a couple of years ago.  Music has been a huge love of mine for many many years now.  The love of craft beer developed slowly after I turned 21; however, it really took off a few years ago, and it was the biggest part of my life that inspired and has driven this blog.  Finally, I feel like I have to pepper a little bit of myself in here now and then.  I have to make it a little personal.  Anyway, I thought the perfect beer to segue back into blogging with would be this bottle from Stillwater Brewing Co.

I’ve reviewed a very small amount of beers from Stillwater on here, but lately I’ve found myself picking up quite a few of their bottles.  I’ve recently been able to find more 12 oz bottles from them, which makes it easier for me to consume on a more regular basis.  Brian Strumke the founder and sole gypsy brewer from this Baltimore based beer company loves to put out Belgian inspired brews, and he does a fine job at it.  Really, this particular bottle stuck out to me for a few different reasons.  First of all, it is called the sensory series and has been brewed with hibiscus.  I’ve had a few different beers utilizing different flowery components which I’ve never been hugely impressed with, but I was curious to see how the sensory aspect would play into it.  As I continued to look into this beer, I realized the Lower Dens aspect was what made it perfect for my blog.  This beer has been brewed with a particular Baltimore based band (Lower Dens) in mind.  In fact, there is a QRL code on the side of the bottle that you can scan and listen to the proper songs the beer was brewed for.  I knew I had to give it a try.

This beer poured a very light golden yellow color.  That was fairly expected, but I was actually interested that it was so hazy.  I suppose the clearly visible layer of yeast left on the bottom of the bottle could have been a hint that the haze was a potential, but I was expecting something more clear.  Not that I’m complaining!  Anyway, there is some very light carbonation visible; however, there is a ton of huge fluffy white head that develop on top of the beer.  It resembled a big cloud that basically never went fully away.  There wasn’t much lacing or sticky reside on the side of the glass.

sensory seriesThe aroma featured some nice light citrusy notes.  It was clear that there was some light orange and tropical pineapple notes at work; however, the yeast is certainly the show stealer.  The big Belgian yeast dominates the nose and basically covers up the majority of the rest of aroma.  It actually had me wondering if there was a little brett in here on top of just your typical Belgian yeast.  The malts don’t seem too overly sweet, and you only get a little bit of that hop aroma.  Ultimately I don’t think I smell any hibiscus.

Flavorwise I would say this beer has a slow start and a big finish.  There is a very light malt intro that features some nice orangey citrus flavors.  These are all a little muted and, if that were the whole beer, you would probably dump it out and forget about it.  However, the very big spicy yeast comes in to kick things up a notch.  The yeast is certainly Belgian in its quality, but it combines with some additional spice on the back half to keep the beer quite good.  The spice isn’t a heat quality, instead it has an almost peppery quality to it.  The pepperiness combined with some faint pineapple notes following the yeast helps to drive this beer forward to its finish.  The spice lingers slightly but in a good way.  I’m certainly not familiar with the flavor of hibiscus, but I read that it can have a slightly tangy flavor.  If that was what I was getting toward the end of the beer, then I like it quite a bit.

The mouthfeel of this one is definitely affected by the yeast and ending spice.  I’d basically describe it as a very active mouthfeel.  Between the yeast, spice, and a high (but not too high) use of carbonation the beer just doesn’t really quit till its gone.  The syrup on it comes in a little at the start, but it is definitely beat into submission rather quickly.

I think this beer took me a little by surprise.  I bought it a little while ago on a whim, and I sat on it never really feeling it.  With the hotter months upon us, it seemed like the right beer after a long day of teaching middle schoolers.  I did try the beer with the music, and I have a feeling the sensory aspect there is a little beyond me, but I still really appreciate the idea.  I don’t promise drinking this beer and listening to Lower Dens will be like Dark Side of the Moon and The Wizard of Oz, but I do promise you’ll get a great beer with a ton of character.  This one really hit the spot for me.

Teacher Grade: A

StillwaterArtisanal

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